It was around September, or so, in 2012, as Bradley Roberts was approaching his 70th birthday, that he decided to write his autobiography. Oddly enough, it would be around the same age, that one of his favourite blues jazz musicians, Mr. B. B. King, also decided to write his autobiography.

“This book is a place for me to pause and look back at who I was and what I became. As I write, I’m seventy years old, and all the joy and hurts, small and large, that I’ve stored up inside me…well, I want to pull ’em out and put ’em on the page. “ From the book B.B. King, Blues All Around Me: The Autobiography of B.B. King

In 2016, Roberts self published his memories entitled Big Bad Brad: The Autobiography of the Honourable Bradley B. E. Roberts. In it, he details a life most ordinary, growing up as poor black boy, in a large family, in the Augusta Street area of Nassau. What began as a typical life for a poor black boy, born in the middle of World War II, in what was then a British West Indian colony, Roberts would somehow change the expected fate meted out to poor blacks at the time, to have an incredible life, structured by sheer determination, hard work, and of course, a little bit of good luck. Roberts details his early life and the explosive fight with his father that changed his life. Not unexpectedly, Roberts goes deep into the politics, and his business career, both of which came to define his life and strong personality. As an amateur genealogist, Roberts also includes interesting facts about his family history.

Roberts dedicated his autobiography as follows:

For my beloved mother
and father.
For my family and
my country and to friendships
whose ties will remain forever
unbroken…

The forward to Mr Roberts’s autobiography was written by one of his oldest, closet friend, confidant and business partner, Sir Franklyn R. Wilson.

The Autobiography of the Honourable Bradley B. E. Roberts

"Whenever someone is tempted to look back on their lives, it is inevitable that they begin where the most influential ...
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART ONE – BECOMING A MAN

Chapter 1 – Delancey Town Boy

Chapter 2 – Counting my shillings

Chapter 3 – I had to leave

Chapter 4 – No longer Tony’s boy

PART TWO – BECOMING ‘BIG BAD BRAD’

Chapter 5 – Walk tall, but carry a big stick

Chapter 6 – Standing in the Sunshine

Chapter 7 – 44 years of my life

Chapter 8 – You can’t be too thin skinned

Chapter 9 – Standing in the Sunshine again

Chapter 10 – Stark realities and bitter losses

Chapter 11 – He crushed the bones to make his bread

Chapter 12 – Setting the record straight

Chapter 13 – Distractions

Chapter 14 – Sir Lynden steps down

Chapter 15 – Taking on the Abaco dragon

Chapter 16 – An unsustainable victory

Chapter 17 – Back in the saddle again

PART THREE – BAHAMIAN BUSINESS AND POLITICS 101

Chapter 18 – Bahamian Business 101

Chapter 19 – Bahamian Politics 101

PART FOUR – THE MOST IMPORTANT FAMILY TREE

Chapter 20 – Oriki Esu (Yoruba prayer)

Chapter 21 – The robbery that was reported around the world

AFTERWARD
Memory is Identity